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Matern Child Nutr. 2018 Oct;14(4):e12608. doi: 10.1111/mcn.12608. Epub 2018 Apr 15.

Ghanaian parents' perceptions of pre and postnatal nutrient supplements and their effects.

Author information

1
Program in International and Community Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.
2
Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.
3
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana.
4
Intake-Center for Dietary Assessment, FHI 360, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
5
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA.
6
Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.

Abstract

Small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNS) have been studied in efficacy and effectiveness trials, but little is known about how parents perceive the products and their effects. In a randomised trial in Ghana, efficacy of SQ-LNS provided to women during pregnancy and the first 6 months postpartum and to their children from 6 to 18 months of age was assessed by comparison with iron-folic acid (IFA) capsules and multiple micronutrient (MMN) capsules provided to women. In a follow-up study conducted when the index children from the original trial were between 4 and 6 years of age, we used survey-based methods to assess retrospective and current parental perceptions of nutrient supplements generally and of SQ-LNS and their effects compared with perceptions IFA and MMN capsules. Most parents perceived that the assigned supplements (SQ-LNS, IFA, or MMN) positively impacted the mother during pregnancy (approximately 89% of both mothers and fathers) and during lactation (84% of mothers and 86% of fathers). Almost all (≥90%) of mothers and fathers perceived that the assigned supplement positively impacted the index child and expected continued positive impacts on the child's health and human capital into the future. A smaller percentage of parents perceived negative impacts of the supplements (7%-17% of mothers and 4%-12% of fathers). Perceptions of positive impacts and of negative impacts did not differ by intervention group. The results suggest that similar populations would likely be receptive to programs to deliver SQ-LNS or micronutrient capsules.

KEYWORDS:

Ghana; child nutrition; maternal nutrition; multiple micronutrients; perceptions; small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements

PMID:
29656569
DOI:
10.1111/mcn.12608
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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