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Molecules. 2012 Jul 5;17(7):8118-35. doi: 10.3390/molecules17078118.

Food-related compounds that modulate expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase may act as its inhibitors.

Author information

1
Environmental and Computational Chemistry Group, University of Cartagena, Cartagena 130015, Colombia.

Abstract

Natural compounds commonly found in foods may contribute to protect cells against the deleterious effects of inflammation. These anti-inflammatory properties have been linked to the modulation of transcription factors that control expression of inflammation-related genes, including the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), rather than a direct inhibitory action on these proteins. In this study, forty two natural dietary compounds, known for their ability to exert an inhibitory effect on the expression of iNOS, have been studied in silico as docking ligands on two available 3D structures for this protein (PDB ID: 3E7G and PDB ID: 1NSI). Natural compounds such as silibinin and cyanidin-3-rutinoside and other flavonoids showed the highest theoretical affinities for iNOS. Docking affinity values calculated for several known iNOS inhibitors significatively correlated with their reported half maximal inhibitory concentrations (R = 0.842, P < 0.0001), suggesting the computational reliability of the predictions made by our docking simulations. Moreover, docking affinity values for potent iNOS inhibitors are of similar magnitude to those obtained for some studied natural products. Results presented here indicate that, in addition to gene expression modulation of proteins involved in inflammation, some chemicals present in food may be acting by direct binding and possible inhibiting actions on iNOS.

PMID:
22766803
PMCID:
PMC6268506
DOI:
10.3390/molecules17078118
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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