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See 1 citation in 2015 by Fletcher NF:

J Gen Virol. 2015 Jun;96(Pt 6):1380-8. doi: 10.1099/vir.0.000090. Epub 2015 Feb 20.

Hepatitis C virus infection of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines.

Author information

1
Centre for Human Virology, Viral Hepatitis Laboratory, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
2
Centre for Liver Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
3
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA.
4
Department of Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen 9713AV, The Netherlands.
5
Inserm U1110, University of Strasbourg 3 Rue Koeberlé, F-67000 Strasbourg, France.
6
Centre for Human Virology, Viral Hepatitis Laboratory, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK Centre for Liver Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK j.a.mckeating@bham.ac.uk.

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects the liver and hepatocytes are the major cell type supporting viral replication. Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes derive from a common hepatic progenitor cell that proliferates during inflammatory conditions, raising the possibility that cholangiocytes may support HCV replication and contribute to the hepatic reservoir. We screened cholangiocytes along with a panel of cholangiocarcinoma-derived cell lines for their ability to support HCV entry and replication. While primary cholangiocytes were refractory to infection and lacked expression of several entry factors, two cholangiocarcinoma lines, CC-LP-1 and Sk-ChA-1, supported efficient HCV entry; furthermore, Sk-ChA-1 cells supported full virus replication. In vivo cholangiocarcinomas expressed all of the essential HCV entry factors; however, cholangiocytes adjacent to the tumour and in normal tissue showed a similar pattern of receptor expression to ex vivo isolated cholangiocytes, lacking SR-BI expression, explaining their inability to support infection. This study provides the first report that HCV can infect cholangiocarcinoma cells and suggests that these heterogeneous tumours may provide a reservoir for HCV replication in vivo.

PMID:
25701818
PMCID:
PMC4635488
DOI:
10.1099/vir.0.000090
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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