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PLoS One. 2014 Apr 9;9(4):e93595. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0093595. eCollection 2014.

Detecting unilateral phrenic paralysis by acoustic respiratory analysis.

Author information

1
Pneumology Service, Germans Trias i Pujol University Hospital, Badalona, Spain; Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona, Spain; Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials, and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona, Spain.
2
Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona, Spain; Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials, and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona, Spain; Dept. ESAII, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona, Spain.
3
Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona, Spain; Innovation Group, Health Sciences Research Institute of the Germans Trias I Pujol Foundation (IGTP), Badalona, Spain.
4
Pneumology Service, Germans Trias i Pujol University Hospital, Badalona, Spain.

Abstract

The consequences of phrenic nerve paralysis vary from a considerable reduction in respiratory function to an apparently normal state. Acoustic analysis of lung sound intensity (LSI) could be an indirect non-invasive measurement of respiratory muscle function, comparing activity on the two sides of the thoracic cage. Lung sounds and airflow were recorded in ten males with unilateral phrenic paralysis and ten healthy subjects (5 men/5 women), during progressive increasing airflow maneuvers. Subjects were in sitting position and two acoustic sensors were placed on their back, on the left and right sides. LSI was determined from 1.2 to 2.4 L/s between 70 and 2000 Hz. LSI was significantly greater on the normal (19.3±4.0 dB) than the affected (5.7±3.5 dB) side in all patients (p = 0.0002), differences ranging from 9.9 to 21.3 dB (13.5±3.5 dB). In the healthy subjects, the LSI was similar on both left (15.1±6.3 dB) and right (17.4±5.7 dB) sides (p = 0.2730), differences ranging from 0.4 to 4.6 dB (2.3±1.6 dB). There was a positive linear relationship between the LSI and the airflow, with clear differences between the slope of patients (about 5 dB/L/s) and healthy subjects (about 10 dB/L/s). Furthermore, the LSI from the affected side of patients was close to the background noise level, at low airflows. As the airflow increases, the LSI from the affected side did also increase, but never reached the levels seen in healthy subjects. Moreover, the difference in LSI between healthy and paralyzed sides was higher in patients with lower FEV1 (%). The acoustic analysis of LSI is a relevant non-invasive technique to assess respiratory function. This method could reinforce the reliability of the diagnosis of unilateral phrenic paralysis, as well as the monitoring of these patients.

PMID:
24718599
PMCID:
PMC3981712
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0093595
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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