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J Pain. 2017 Jul;18(7):787-799. doi: 10.1016/j.jpain.2017.02.428. Epub 2017 May 4.

Feelings of Clinician-Patient Similarity and Trust Influence Pain: Evidence From Simulated Clinical Interactions.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Cox Neuroscience Annex, Coral Gables, Florida. Electronic address: e.losin@miami.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Cox Neuroscience Annex, Coral Gables, Florida.
3
Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado.

Abstract

Pain is influenced by many factors other than external sources of tissue damage. Among these, the clinician-patient relationship is particularly important for pain diagnosis and treatment. However, the effects of the clinician-patient relationship on pain remain underexamined. We tested the hypothesis that patients who believe they share core beliefs and values with their clinician will report less pain than patients who do not. We also measured feelings of perceived clinician-patient similarity and trust to see if these interpersonal factors influenced pain. We did so by experimentally manipulating perceptions of similarity between participants playing the role of clinicians and participants playing the role of patients in simulated clinical interactions. Participants were placed in 2 groups on the basis of their responses to a questionnaire about their personal beliefs and values, and painful thermal stimulation was used as an analog of a painful medical procedure. We found that patients reported feeling more similarity and trust toward their clinician when they were paired with clinicians from their own group. In turn, patients' positive feelings of similarity and trust toward their clinicians-but not clinicians' feelings toward patients or whether the clinician and patient were from the same group-predicted lower pain ratings. Finally, the most anxious patients exhibited the strongest relationship between their feelings about their clinicians and their pain report. These findings increase our understanding of context-driven pain modulation and suggest that interventions aimed at increasing patients' feelings of similarity to and trust in health care providers may help reduce the pain experienced during medical care.

PERSPECTIVE:

We present novel evidence that the clinician-patient relationship can affect the pain experienced during medical care. We found that "patients" in simulated clinical interactions who reported feeling more similarity and trust toward their "clinicians" reported less pain, suggesting that increasing feelings of clinician-patient similarity and trust may reduce pain disparities.

KEYWORDS:

Clinician-patient; concordance; health disparities; pain; similarity; trust

PMID:
28479279
PMCID:
PMC5590751
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpain.2017.02.428
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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