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Int J Hyperthermia. 2007 Sep;23(6):493-500.

Feasibility study of postoperative intraperitoneal hyperthermochemotherapy by radiofrequency capacitive heating system for advanced gastric cancer with peritoneal seeding.

Author information

1
Gunma University, General Surgical Science, Maebashi, Japan. emochiki@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Gastric carcinoma patients with peritoneal dissemination have an extremely poor prognosis. Attempting to improve regional control and decrease the risk of complications related to hyperthermic chemotherapy, we applied a new treatment modality using a combination of gastrectomy with postoperative intraperitoneal hyperthermo-chemotherapy (PIHC) using Thermotron RF-8. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of PIHC in advanced gastric carcinoma patients with peritoneal seeding.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Between March 2002 and April 2006, 20 gastric carcinoma patients with peritoneal dissemination were allocated to two groups in the patient's selection. The PIHC group (10 patients) received a 60-min PIHC with a cisplatin dose of 80 mg/m2 two weeks after surgery, and the control group (10 patients) received surgery alone. Thermotron RF-8 is a heating device that can raise temperatures in both superficial and deep-seated tumours using 8 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic waves as a source of heat.

RESULTS:

No patients in either group had life-threatening complications. The most frequent nonhaematologic toxicity (grade 3) was nausea. The one-, two-, and three-year cumulative survival rates for the PIHC group were 60%, 48%, and 36%, respectively, whereas those for the control group were 40%, 10%, and 0%, respectively. The survival rates for the PIHC group were significantly higher than those for the control group.

CONCLUSION:

Although this study was conducted non-randomly with a small number of patients, the PIHC group had a higher survival rate and better prognosis compared with the control group.

PMID:
17952763
DOI:
10.1080/02656730701658234
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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