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Anesth Analg. 1999 Dec;89(6):1352-9.

Factors contributing to a prolonged stay after ambulatory surgery.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. fchung@torhosp.toronto.on.ca

Abstract

We identified predictors for prolonged postoperative stay after ambulatory surgery using multiple logistic regression models. We collected perioperative data for 16,411 ambulatory surgical patients. A log-transformed time to discharge variable was modeled by multiple linear regression, including patient-, anesthesia-, and surgery-specific variables. The impact of hypothetical elimination of perioperative adverse events on mean length of stay was also estimated. Separate analyses were performed among patients who received general anesthesia (GA) and monitored anesthesia care (MAC). Patients receiving GA stayed 50 min longer than patients receiving MAC. Patients receiving GA and undergoing strabismus, transurethral, or otorhinolaryngological/dental procedures had the longest postoperative stay. Among patients receiving GA, smokers had a 4% shorter stay compared with nonsmokers; among patients receiving MAC, those with congestive heart failure (CHF) had a 11% longer stay compared with patients without CHF. Postoperative nausea and vomiting, dizziness, excessive pain, and cardiovascular events predicted 22%-79% increases in postoperative stay. The hypothetical elimination of all adverse events resulted in a 9.6% decrease in mean length of stay among patients receiving GA, but in only a 3.8% decrease among patients receiving MAC. The length of postoperative stay among ambulatory surgical patients is mainly determined by the type of surgery and by adverse events, such as excessive pain, postoperative nausea and vomiting, dizziness, drowsiness, and cardiovascular events. Patients with CHF and those who underwent long procedures had a higher risk of a prolonged stay. Appropriate prevention and management of postoperative symptoms could significantly decrease the length of stay among patients receiving GA.

IMPLICATIONS:

The length of postoperative stay among ambulatory surgical patients is mainly determined by the type of surgery and by adverse events, such as excessive pain, postoperative nausea and vomiting, dizziness, drowsiness, and untoward cardiovascular events. Patients with congestive heart failure and those who underwent long procedures had a higher risk of a prolonged stay. Appropriate prevention and management of postoperative symptoms could significantly decrease the length of stay among patients receiving general anesthesia.

PMID:
10589607
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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