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Occup Environ Med. 2020 Feb;77(2):107-114. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2019-105843. Epub 2019 Dec 4.

Exposure to traffic noise and gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention: a cohort study.

Author information

1
Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark mettes@cancer.dk.
2
Department of Natural Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
3
Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
4
Department of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Roskilde, Denmark.
6
Global Centre for Clean Air Research (GCARE), University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.
7
Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Transportation noise has been associated with markers of obesity. We aimed to investigate whether road traffic and railway noise were associated with weight gain during and after pregnancy.

METHODS:

Among the women participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort, 74 065 reported on weight before and during the pregnancy (gestational week 30) and 52 661 reported on weight before and 18 months after pregnancy. Residential address history from conception to 18 months after pregnancy was obtained in national registers, and road traffic and railway noise were modelled for all addresses. Associations between noise and gestational weight gain (GWG) and postpartum weight retention (PPWR) were analysed using the linear and log-binomial regression.

RESULTS:

A 10 dB(A) higher road traffic noise was associated with an increase in GWG of 3.8 g/week (95% CI 2.3 to 5.3) and PPWR of 0.09 kg (95% CI 0.02 to 0.16). For PPWR, this association seemed confined to women who were overweight (0.17 kg, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.32) or obese (0.49 kg, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.73) before pregnancy. Further adjustment by nitrogen dioxide reduced GWG risk estimates and slightly increased PPWR risk estimates. Railway noise ≥65 dB(A) was associated with an increase in GWG of 4.5 g/week (95% CI -2.7 to 11.6) and PPWR of 0.26 kg (95% CI -0.09 to 0.60) compared with levels <55 dB(A).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that road traffic noise is associated with weight gain during and after the pregnancy, which adds to the literature linking transportation noise to adiposity.

KEYWORDS:

epidemiology; noise; weight gain

PMID:
31801799
DOI:
10.1136/oemed-2019-105843

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: None declared.

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