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Ment Health Phys Act. 2016 Mar;10:25-32. Epub 2016 May 10.

Exercise Self-Efficacy Moderates the Relation between Anxiety Sensitivity and Body Mass Index and Exercise Tolerance in Treatment-Seeking Smokers.

Author information

1
University of Houston, Department of Psychology, Houston, TX; Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, RI.
2
The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Psychology and Institute for Mental Health Research, Austin, TX.
3
Southern Methodist University, Department of Psychology, Dallas, TX.
4
Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Providence, RI.
5
Boston University, Department of Psychology, Boston, MA.
6
University of California, San Diego, Department of Family & Preventive Medicine, San Diego, CA.
7
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA.
8
University of Houston, Department of Psychology, Houston, TX; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Behavioral Science, Houston, TX.

Abstract

There is little known about factors that contribute to the comorbidity of cigarette smoking and obesity. The current study sought to test whether exercise self-efficacy moderated the relation between anxiety sensitivity (fear of internal sensations) and BMI and exercise tolerance among cigarette smokers. Smokers (n = 72; 50% female; Mcpd = 19.3, SD = 10.65) were recruited to participate in a smoking cessation treatment trial. During medical screen, we measured weight, height, and exercise tolerance (functional capacity) employing a standardized maximal exercise testing protocol. After adjusting for participant sex and cigarettes per day, exercise self-efficacy moderated the association between anxiety sensitivity and BMI, such that the positive association between anxiety sensitivity and BMI was significantly stronger when exercise self-efficacy was low. The same pattern of results emerged for exercise tolerance. Exercise self-efficacy moderated the association between anxiety sensitivity and exercise tolerance, such that the negative association between anxiety sensitivity and exercise tolerance was significantly stronger when exercise self-efficacy was low. Among smokers, anxiety sensitivity may be a risk variable that, directly and indirectly in the context of low self-efficacy for exercise, causes or maintains higher body weight and lower exercise tolerance.

KEYWORDS:

anxiety vulnerability; functional capacity; nicotine dependence; obesity; physical activity; self-efficacy

PMID:
27725844
PMCID:
PMC5055124
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.mhpa.2016.05.001

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