Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found using an alternative search:

Front Pharmacol. 2014 Dec 2;5:252. doi: 10.3389/fphar.2014.00252. eCollection 2014.

Evolving toward a human-cell based and multiscale approach to drug discovery for CNS disorders.

Author information

1
Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York, NY, USA ; Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York, NY, USA.
2
Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company Indianapolis, IN, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

A disruptive approach to therapeutic discovery and development is required in order to significantly improve the success rate of drug discovery for central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In this review, we first assess the key factors contributing to the frequent clinical failures for novel drugs. Second, we discuss cancer translational research paradigms that addressed key issues in drug discovery and development and have resulted in delivering drugs with significantly improved outcomes for patients. Finally, we discuss two emerging technologies that could improve the success rate of CNS therapies: human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-based studies and multiscale biology models. Coincident with advances in cellular technologies that enable the generation of hiPSCs directly from patient blood or skin cells, together with methods to differentiate these hiPSC lines into specific neural cell types relevant to neurological disease, it is also now possible to combine data from large-scale forward genetics and post-mortem global epigenetic and expression studies in order to generate novel predictive models. The application of systems biology approaches to account for the multiscale nature of different data types, from genetic to molecular and cellular to clinical, can lead to new insights into human diseases that are emergent properties of biological networks, not the result of changes to single genes. Such studies have demonstrated the heterogeneity in etiological pathways and the need for studies on model systems that are patient-derived and thereby recapitulate neurological disease pathways with higher fidelity. In the context of two common and presumably representative neurological diseases, the neurodegenerative disease Alzheimer's Disease, and the psychiatric disorder schizophrenia, we propose the need for, and exemplify the impact of, a multiscale biology approach that can integrate panomic, clinical, imaging, and literature data in order to construct predictive disease network models that can (i) elucidate subtypes of syndromic diseases, (ii) provide insights into disease networks and targets and (iii) facilitate a novel drug screening strategy using patient-derived hiPSCs to discover novel therapeutics for CNS disorders.

KEYWORDS:

complex disease mechanism; drug discovery screening; high throughput biology; stem cell-based screening; systems biology and network biology

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Frontiers Media SA Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center