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Prev Med. 2018 Mar;108:36-40. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.12.024. Epub 2017 Dec 27.

Evaluation of Let's Move! active schools activation grants.

Author information

1
Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, United States. Electronic address: GMiller2@cdc.gov.
2
Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, United States.
3
Active Schools, Partnership for a Healthier America, United States.
4
GENYOUth, NY, New York 10022, United States.
5
ChildObesity180, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA, United States.

Abstract

Let's Move! Active Schools (LMAS), now Active Schools, is a national initiative in the United States (US) that aims to engage schools to increase students' opportunities to be physically active. This evaluation describes changes in school-level practices related to physical education (PE) and physical activity (PA) among schools that received an LMAS-partner grant from ChildObesity180 or Fuel Up to Play 60 (FUTP60). ChildObesity180 and FUTP60 asked grantee schools to complete nine common questions, between October 2013 and August 2014, before and after receiving the grants to assess progress in implementing practices for PE and PA. "Yes" responses indicated presence of PE/PA-supportive practices. For schools with complete pre and post data (n=972), frequencies of "yes" responses were calculated for each practice at pre/post. Schools receiving a FUTP60 partner grant reported statistically significant improvements from pre to post across five practices for PE and PA, and ChildObesity180 grantees reported significant increases on all practices except daily recess, which was already in place at 95% of schools at pre-survey. Schools across both grant programs reported the largest increases for promoting PA via messaging, implementing classroom PA breaks, and providing PA before and after school. Schools in both programs reported smaller, but statistically significant, increases in requiring the recommended minutes of PE. This study illustrates the feasibility of offering small grants, at a national scale, for schools to make changes that support PA throughout the day. Results suggest that schools can shift PA policies and practices over the course of a school year.

KEYWORDS:

Active classrooms; Physical activity; Physical education; Recess

PMID:
29288779
PMCID:
PMC5828981
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.12.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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