Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

BJU Int. 2017 Nov;120(5B):E21-E29. doi: 10.1111/bju.13885. Epub 2017 May 17.

Evaluating an educational intervention to alleviate distress amongst men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer and their partners.

Author information

1
Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
2
Vancouver Prostate Centre, Gordon and Leslie Diamond Health Care Centre, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
3
School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
4
Department of Urologic Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
5
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether an education session alleviates distress for both patients with prostate cancer and their partners; and whether their partner's attendance at the session; and disease, treatment, and sociodemographic characteristics affect changes in distress levels.

PATIENTS, SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

We identified men with untreated prostate cancer at the Vancouver Prostate Centre between February 2015 and March 2016 who agreed to attend our education session. The session consisted of a didactic presentation covering the biology of prostate cancer, treatment options, and side-effects, followed by a private joint session with a urologist and radiation oncologist. We assessed distress using the Distress Thermometer (DT) and compared pre- and post-session distress, and change in distress between patients and partners using matched and unmatched t-tests, respectively. We also assessed pre-session anxiety using the seven-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder measure, and decisional certainty using the Decisional Conflict Scale.

RESULTS:

In all, 71 patients and 48 partners participated in the study. Attending the session led to a significant reduction in the median DT score for patients (4.0-3.0, P < 0.01) and partners (5.0-4.0, P = 0.02). Partners reported higher distress both before and after the session (4.9 vs 3.8, P = 0.03 pre-session and 4.2 vs 3.2, P = 0.03 post-session). The presence of a partner at the session did not affect patients' pre- or post-session distress or the success of the session at alleviating distress. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics had little effect on distress levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

An interdisciplinary education session is equally effective at alleviating distress for both patients with prostate cancer and their female partners.

KEYWORDS:

anxiety; distress; education; patients and partners; prostate cancer; psychological needs

PMID:
28516513
DOI:
10.1111/bju.13885
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center