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Nat Med. 2018 Jun;24(6):857-867. doi: 10.1038/s41591-018-0042-6. Epub 2018 Jun 4.

Epitope-based vaccine design yields fusion peptide-directed antibodies that neutralize diverse strains of HIV-1.

Author information

1
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
2
National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy, Simons Electron Microscopy Center, New York Structural Biology Center, New York, NY, USA.
3
Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.
4
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
5
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
6
Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
7
Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Cancer Research Technology Program, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA.
8
GenScript USA, Piscataway, NJ, USA.
9
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. jmascola@nih.gov.
10
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. pdkwong@nih.gov.
11
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. pdkwong@nih.gov.

Abstract

A central goal of HIV-1 vaccine research is the elicitation of antibodies capable of neutralizing diverse primary isolates of HIV-1. Here we show that focusing the immune response to exposed N-terminal residues of the fusion peptide, a critical component of the viral entry machinery and the epitope of antibodies elicited by HIV-1 infection, through immunization with fusion peptide-coupled carriers and prefusion stabilized envelope trimers, induces cross-clade neutralizing responses. In mice, these immunogens elicited monoclonal antibodies capable of neutralizing up to 31% of a cross-clade panel of 208 HIV-1 strains. Crystal and cryoelectron microscopy structures of these antibodies revealed fusion peptide conformational diversity as a molecular explanation for the cross-clade neutralization. Immunization of guinea pigs and rhesus macaques induced similarly broad fusion peptide-directed neutralizing responses, suggesting translatability. The N terminus of the HIV-1 fusion peptide is thus a promising target of vaccine efforts aimed at eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies.

Comment in

PMID:
29867235
PMCID:
PMC6358635
DOI:
10.1038/s41591-018-0042-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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