Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Aug 15;80(4):274-283. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2015.09.007. Epub 2015 Sep 25.

Enhancement of Psychosocial Treatment With D-Cycloserine: Models, Moderators, and Future Directions.

Author information

1
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: mwotto@bu.edu.
2
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Institute for Mental Health Research and Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas.
4
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts; Institute for Mental Health Research and Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; Overwaal Centre for Anxiety Disorders, Pro Persona, Radboud University Nijmegen, Behavioral Science Institute, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Psychiatry, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.
5
Overwaal Centre for Anxiety Disorders, Pro Persona, Radboud University Nijmegen, Behavioral Science Institute, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.

Abstract

Advances in the understanding of the neurobiology of fear extinction have resulted in the development of d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate agonist, as an augmentation strategy for exposure treatment. We review a decade of research that has focused on the efficacy of DCS for augmenting the mechanisms (e.g., fear extinction) and outcome of exposure treatment across the anxiety disorders. Following a series of small-scale studies offering strong support for this clinical application, more recent larger-scale studies have yielded mixed results, with some showing weak or no effects. We discuss possible explanations for the mixed findings, pointing to both patient and session (i.e., learning experiences) characteristics as possible moderators of efficacy, and offer directions for future research in this area. We also review recent studies that have aimed to extend the work on DCS augmentation of exposure therapy for the anxiety disorders to DCS enhancement of learning-based interventions for addiction, anorexia nervosa, schizophrenia, and depression. Here, we attend to both DCS effects on facilitating therapeutic outcomes and additional therapeutic mechanisms beyond fear extinction (e.g., appetitive extinction, hippocampal-dependent learning).

KEYWORDS:

Addiction; Anxiety; DCS; Depression; Extinction; d-cycloserine

PMID:
26520240
PMCID:
PMC4808479
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2015.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center