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Lancet. 2017 Dec 16;390(10113):2655-2661. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32337-1. Epub 2017 Sep 1.

Endovascular baroreflex amplification for resistant hypertension: a safety and proof-of-principle clinical study.

Author information

1
Department of Vascular Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands. Electronic address: W.Spiering@umcutrecht.nl.
2
University College London (UCL) Institute of Cardiovascular Science and National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) UCL Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK.
3
Department of Cardiology, St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Netherlands.
4
Department of Vascular Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
5
Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
7
Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
8
Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, Netherlands.
9
Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre of the University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
10
OhioHealth Research Institute, Columbus, OH, USA.
11
Columbia University Medical Center and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY, USA.
12
CAMC Research Institute and West Virginia University, Charleston, WV, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Carotid baroreflex activation lowers blood pressure and might have potential application for the treatment of resistant hypertension. We did a proof-of-principle trial with a novel endovascular baroreceptor amplification device, MobiusHD (Vascular Dynamics, Mountain View, CA, USA), in patients with resistant hypertension.

METHODS:

CALM-FIM_EUR was a prospective, first-in-human, open-label study done at six European centres. Eligible patients were adults with resistant hypertension (office systolic blood pressure ≥160 mm Hg despite taking at least three antihypertensive agents, including a diuretic). MobiusHD devices were implanted unilaterally in the internal carotid artery. The primary endpoint was the incidence of serious adverse events at 6 months. Secondary endpoints included changes in office and 24 h ambulatory blood pressure. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01911897.

FINDINGS:

Between December, 2013, and February, 2016, 30 patients were enrolled and underwent successful implantation. Mean age was 52 years (SD 12), 15 patients (50%) were men, and mean antihypertensive use was 4·4 drugs (1·4). Mean office blood pressure was 184/109 mm Hg (18/14) at baseline and was reduced by 24/12 mm Hg (13-34/6-18) at 6 months (p=0·0003 for systolic and p=0·0001 diastolic blood pressure). Mean baseline 24 h ambulatory blood pressure was 166/100 mm Hg (17/14) at baseline and was reduced by 21/12 mm Hg (14-29/7-16) at 6 months (p<0·0001 for systolic and diastolic blood pressure). Five serious adverse events had occurred in four patients (13%) at 6 months: hypotension (n=2), worsening hypertension (n=1), intermittent claudication (n=1) and wound infection (n=1).

INTERPRETATION:

In patients with resistant hypertension, endovascular baroreceptor amplification with the MobiusHD device substantially lowered blood pressure with an acceptable safety profile. Randomised, double-blind, sham-controlled trials are warranted to investigate the use of this treatment further.

FUNDING:

Vascular Dynamics.

PMID:
28870716
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32337-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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