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Int J Biometeorol. 2014 Sep;58(7):1503-12. doi: 10.1007/s00484-013-0754-8. Epub 2013 Oct 23.

Effects of negative air ions on oxygen uptake kinetics, recovery and performance in exercise: a randomized, double-blinded study.

Author information

1
Institute for Sports Medicine and Science, Olympic Center, IMSB Austria, Johann Steinboeck Str. 5, 2344, Maria Enzersdorf, Austria, alfred.nimmerichter@fhwn.ac.at.

Abstract

Limited research has suggested that acute exposure to negatively charged ions may enhance cardio-respiratory function, aerobic metabolism and recovery following exercise. To test the physiological effects of negatively charged air ions, 14 trained males (age: 32 ± 7 years; VO2max: 57 ± 7 mL min(-1) kg(-1)) were exposed for 20 min to either a high-concentration of air ions (ION: 220 ± 30 × 10(3) ions cm(-3)) or normal room conditions (PLA: 0.1 ± 0.06 × 10(3) ions cm(-3)) in an ionization chamber in a double-blinded, randomized order, prior to performing: (1) a bout of severe-intensity cycling exercise for determining the time constant of the phase II VO2 response (τ) and the magnitude of the VO2 slow component (SC); and (2) a 30-s Wingate test that was preceded by three 30-s Wingate tests to measure plasma [adrenaline] (ADR), [nor-adrenaline] (N-ADR) and blood [lactate] (B(Lac)) over 20 min during recovery in the ionization chamber. There was no difference between ION and PLA for the phase II VO2 τ (32 ± 14 s vs. 32 ± 14 s; P = 0.7) or VO2 SC (404 ± 214 mL vs 482 ± 217 mL; P = 0.17). No differences between ION and PLA were observed at any time-point for ADR, N-ADR and B(Lac) as well as on peak and mean power output during the Wingate tests (all P > 0.05). A high-concentration of negatively charged air ions had no effect on aerobic metabolism during severe-intensity exercise or on performance or the recovery of the adrenergic and metabolic responses after repeated-sprint exercise in trained athletes.

PMID:
24149934
DOI:
10.1007/s00484-013-0754-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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