Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

J Pediatr. 2015 Jun;166(6):1370-6.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.02.041. Epub 2015 Apr 1.

Effectiveness of structured education on knowledge and health behaviors in patients with congenital heart disease.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Research Foundation Flanders, Brussel, Belgium.
2
I-BioStat, KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; I-BioStat, UHasselt, Hasselt, Belgium.
3
Division of Congenital and Structural Cardiology, KU Leuven-University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
4
School Psychology and Child and Adolescent Development, KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
5
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, KU Leuven-University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
6
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; The Heart Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: philip.moons@kuleuven.be.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether a single educational session increased the level of knowledge and changed the prevalence of health risk behaviors in young people with congenital heart disease (CHD).

STUDY DESIGN:

We conducted a longitudinal study of patients transferred to adult CHD care who received a single educational session (n = 201) at a tertiary care center. Their knowledge level and prevalence of health risk behaviors were assessed via the Leuven Knowledge Questionnaire CHD and the Health Behavior Scale CHD, respectively. A general linear model for longitudinal measurements was used to analyze the natural progression of patients' knowledge during a 27-month period and the effect of one educational session on outcomes.

RESULTS:

Participating in an educational session resulted in a small-to-moderate, but significant, increase in total knowledge level and better understanding of deterioration symptoms, and rationale and frequency of follow-up; however, it did not improve patients' health behaviors.

CONCLUSIONS:

This type of education did improve knowledge but did not improve the patients' tendency to engage in better health behaviors. Future studies should assess the effect of repetitive exposure to educational sessions dealing with CHD.

PMID:
25841537
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.02.041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center