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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2016 Oct;97(10):1777-1784.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2016.04.006. Epub 2016 May 3.

Effectiveness of Group Wheelchair Skills Training for People With Spinal Cord Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. Electronic address: law93@pitt.edu.
2
Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
3
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
4
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
5
Kessler Foundation, West Orange, NJ; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ.
6
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
7
Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
8
Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, West Orange, NJ.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the effectiveness of group wheelchair skills training to elicit improvements in wheelchair skills.

DESIGN:

Randomized double-blinded controlled trial.

SETTING:

Four Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems Centers.

PARTICIPANTS:

Manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (N=114).

INTERVENTION:

Six 90-minute group Wheelchair Skills Training Program (WSTP) classes or two 1-hour active control sessions with 6 to 10 people per group.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Baseline (t1) and 1-month follow-up (t2) Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire (WST-Q) (Version 4.2) for capacity and performance and Goal Attainment Scale (GAS) score.

RESULTS:

Follow-up was completed by 79 participants (WSTP: n=36, active control: n=43). No differences were found between missing and complete cases. Many users were highly skilled at baseline with a WST-Q capacity interquartile range of 77% to 97%. There were no differences between groups at baseline in WST-Q measures or demographics. Compared with the active control group, the WSTP group improved in WST-Q capacity advanced score (P=.02) but not in WST-Q capacity or WST-Q performance total scores (P=.068 and P=.873, respectively). The average GAS score (0% at t1) for the WSTP group at t2 was 65.6%±34.8%. Higher GAS scores and WST-Q capacity scores were found for those who attended more classes and had lower baseline skills.

CONCLUSIONS:

Group training can improve advanced wheelchair skills capacity and facilitate achievement of individually set goals. Lower skill levels at baseline and increased attendance were correlated with greater improvement.

KEYWORDS:

Motor skills; Rehabilitation; Spinal cord injuries; Wheelchairs

PMID:
27153762
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2016.04.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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