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Russ J Immunol. 2003 Apr;8(1):53-60.

Effect of polyoxidonium on the phagocytic activity of human peripheral blood leukocytes.

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1
National Research Center - Institute of Immunology, Ministry of Public Health, Moscow, Russia.

Abstract

The effect of polyoxidonium on the functional activity of human peripheral blood phagocytes was studied in vitro. Polyoxidonium is an N-oxidized polyethylene-piperazine derivative, a water-soluble high-molecular synthetic immunomodulator. It was established that a one-hour incubation of leukocytes with polyoxidonium increases the ability of leukocytes to kill the ingested Staphylococcus aureus in a dose-dependent manner. This increase was observed in leukocytes obtained from healthy individuals and from patients with chronic granulomatous disease. The study of phagocyte spontaneous and stimulated chemiluminescence showed a significant decrease in the quantity of chemiluminescent impulses in the extracellular space in the presence of polyoxidonium both in luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence assays. Polyoxidonium proved to have an antioxidant activity at all doses tested (100, 250, and 500 &mgr;g/ml). Evaluation of the intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) level with a fluorescent indicator dichlorofluorescein showed that incubation with polyoxidonium leads to a higher luminescence intensity of dichlorofluorescein, thus indicating an increase in the intracellular H(2)O(2) level. This increase was not as substantial as in the case of stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate. When polyoxidonium was used at a dose of 500 &mgr;g/ml, the difference with the control was significant for neutrophils and monocytes. Polyoxidonium can be used as adjuvant in combined treatment of acute and chronic infections of any etiology, and in the treatment of chronic granulomatous disease and secondary immunodeficiences along with etiotropic drugs.

PMID:
12717555
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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