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Kardiol Pol. 2010 May;68(5):539-43.

Early abciximab use in ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention improves long-term outcome. Data from EUROTRANSFER Registry.

Author information

1
Institute of Cardiology, Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland. zbigniew.siudak@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is the preferred method of reperfusion in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Abciximab is a well established adjunct to primary PCI. The proper timing of abciximab administration in STEMI patients has been investigated in randomised trials, registries and metanalysis, providing conflicting results.

METHODS:

Consecutive data on STEMI patients, transferred for primary PCI in hospital/ambulance STEMI networks between November 2005 and January 2007, from 15 PCI centres in seven European countries was gathered together for a one-year long-term clinical observation (93% rate of completeness).

RESULTS:

Data from 1,650 patients was collected in the EUROTRANSFER Registry. Abciximab was administered to 1,086 patients (66%), 727 patients received early (at least 30 minutes prior to first balloon inflation) abciximab (EA), and another 359 patients received late abciximab (LA). One year mortality was 5.8% in the EA group vs 10.3% with LA (p = 0.007). Adjustment for propensity score methods for EA administration did not change the results, still providing a favourable outcome for the EA group (p = 0.004). It was also revealed that only a minority of patients (36%) were treated within the 90-minute recommended time window from first medical contact to PCI (and 60% for the 120-min time delay).

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients transferred for primary PCI in STEMI hospital networks showed lower rates of death in long-term one-year clinical follow-up when treatment with abciximab was started early.

PMID:
20491016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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