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Addict Behav. 2016 Jan;52:75-82. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.07.028. Epub 2015 Jul 29.

Drinking norms, readiness to change, and gender as moderators of a combined alcohol intervention for first-year college students.

Author information

1
Veterans Affairs/University of Washington, Department of Health Services, 1100 Olive Way, Suite 1400, Seattle, WA 98108, United States. Electronic address: Joel.Grossbard@va.gov.
2
Brown University, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Box G-S121-5, Providence RI 02912, United States.
3
University of Washington, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 1100 NE 45th Street, Suite 300, Seattle, WA 98105, United States.
4
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Center of Alcohol Studies, 607 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, United States.
5
The Pennsylvania State University, Biobehavioral Health and Prevention Center, 210 Biobehavioral Health Building, University Park, PA 16802, United States.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Alcohol interventions targeting college students and their parents have been shown to be efficacious. Little research has examined moderators of intervention efficacy to help tailor interventions for subgroups of students.

METHOD:

This study is a secondary data analysis of readiness to change, drinking norms, and gender as moderators of an efficacious peer- and parent-based intervention (Turrisi et al., 2009). Students (n=680) were randomized to the combined peer and parent intervention (n=342) or assessment-only control (n=338).

RESULTS:

The combined intervention reduced peak blood alcohol content (BAC) compared to control. Gender and norms did not moderate the relationship between the intervention and drinking. Significant interactions were found between gender, precontemplation, and intervention. Students in the combined condition with higher precontemplation had lower weekly drinking compared to those with lower precontemplation. This pattern was also found among men for peak BAC and alcohol-related consequences but not among women, indicating a three-way interaction.

CONCLUSION:

Interventions may need to consider readiness to change and gender to optimize effectiveness.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol intervention; College students; Moderators; Norms; Readiness to change

PMID:
26363307
PMCID:
PMC6486950
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.07.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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