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Microb Genom. 2019 Jul;5(7). doi: 10.1099/mgen.0.000279. Epub 2019 Jul 16.

Domestication of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11168.

Author information

1
The Milner Centre for Evolution, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath, UK.
2
MRC CLIMB Consortium, Bath, UK.
3
Swansea University Medical School, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, UK.
4
Department of Infectious Diseases, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia.
5
Cambridge Baker Systems Genomics Initiative, Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, 75 Commercial Rd, Melbourne 3004, Victoria, Australia.
6
University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
7
Roslin Institute, Edinburgh, UK.
8
UCL Eastman Dental Institute, University College of London, London, UK.
9
Animal and Plant Health Agency, Weybridge, Surrey, UK.
10
‡​Present address: Antimicrobial Resistance Policy and Surveillance Team, Veterinary Medicines Directorate, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), Surrey, UK.
11
University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
12
University of Aberystwyth, Aberystwyth, UK.
13
School of Clinical Veterinary Science, Langford, Bristol, UK.
14
Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
15
NIHR Health Protections Research Unit in Gastrointestinal Infections, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
16
Quadram Institute Bioscience, Norwich, UK.
17
University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
18
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
19
Wellcome Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK.
20
Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
21
School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Surrey, Surrey, UK.

Abstract

Reference and type strains of well-known bacteria have been a cornerstone of microbiology research for decades. The sharing of well-characterized isolates among laboratories has run in parallel with research efforts and enhanced the reproducibility of experiments, leading to a wealth of knowledge about trait variation in different species and the underlying genetics. Campylobacter jejuni strain NCTC 11168, deposited at the National Collection of Type Cultures in 1977, has been adopted widely as a reference strain by researchers worldwide and was the first Campylobacter for which the complete genome was published (in 2000). In this study, we collected 23 C. jejuni NCTC 11168 reference isolates from laboratories across the UK and compared variation in simple laboratory phenotypes with genetic variation in sequenced genomes. Putatively identical isolates, identified previously to have aberrant phenotypes, varied by up to 281 SNPs (in 15 genes) compared to the most recent reference strain. Isolates also display considerable phenotype variation in motility, morphology, growth at 37 °C, invasion of chicken and human cell lines, and susceptibility to ampicillin. This study provides evidence of ongoing evolutionary change among C. jejuni isolates as they are cultured in different laboratories and highlights the need for careful consideration of genetic variation within laboratory reference strains. This article contains data hosted by Microreact.

KEYWORDS:

Campylobacter; culture collections; genomics; microbial evolution

PMID:
31310201
PMCID:
PMC6700657
DOI:
10.1099/mgen.0.000279
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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