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BMJ. 2006 Jun 3;332(7553):1312-3.

Differences in risk factors for partial and no immunisation in the first year of life: prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Centre for Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare demographic, social, maternal, and infant related factors associated with partial immunisation and no immunisation in the first year of life in the United Kingdom.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Sample of electoral wards in England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, stratified by measures of ethnic composition and social disadvantage.

PARTICIPANTS:

18,488 infants born between September 2000 and January 2002, resident in the UK and eligible to receive child benefit (a universal benefit available to all families) at age 9 months.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Immunisation status at 9 months of age, defined as fully immunised, partially immunised, or not immunised.

RESULTS:

Overall in the UK, 3.3% of infants were partially immunised and 1.1% were unimmunised; these rates were highest in England (3.6% and 1.3%, respectively; P < 0.01). Residence in ethnic or disadvantaged wards, larger family size, lone or teenaged parenthood, maternal smoking in pregnancy, and admission to hospital by 9 months of age were independently associated with partial immunisation status. In contrast, a higher proportion of mothers of unimmunised infants were educated to degree level or above (1.9%), were older (3.1%), or were of black Caribbean ethnicity (4.7%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Mothers of unimmunised infants differ in terms of age and education from those of partially immunised infants. Interventions to reduce incomplete immunisation in infancy need different approaches.

PMID:
16740559
PMCID:
PMC1473111
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.332.7553.1312
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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