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Eat Behav. 2015 Aug;18:48-53. doi: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2015.03.013. Epub 2015 Apr 6.

Desire thinking: A risk factor for binge eating?

Author information

1
School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, London, UK. Electronic address: spadam@lsbu.ac.uk.
2
School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, London, UK; Studi Cognitivi, Milan, Italy.
3
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, London, UK; CASCAID, South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
4
Studi Cognitivi, Milan, Italy.
5
University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.

Abstract

In the current study we explored the role of desire thinking in predicting binge eating independently of Body Mass Index, negative affect and irrational food beliefs. A sample of binge eaters (n=77) and a sample of non-binge eaters (n=185) completed the following self-report instruments: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Irrational Food Beliefs Scale, Desire Thinking Questionnaire, and Binge Eating Scale. Mann-Whitney U tests revealed that all variable scores were significantly higher for binge eaters than non-binge eaters. A logistic regression analysis indicated that verbal perseveration was a predictor of classification as a binge eater over and above Body Mass Index, negative affect and irrational food beliefs. A hierarchical regression analysis, on the combined sample, indicated that verbal perseveration predicted levels of binge eating independently of Body Mass Index, negative affect and irrational food beliefs. These results highlight the possible role of desire thinking as a risk factor for binge eating.

KEYWORDS:

Binge eating; Desire thinking; Irrational food beliefs; Negative affect; Self-reported Body Mass Index

PMID:
25880044
DOI:
10.1016/j.eatbeh.2015.03.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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