Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found using an alternative search:

J Autism Dev Disord. 2015 Oct;45(10):3308-15. doi: 10.1007/s10803-015-2490-x.

Food selectivity, mealtime behavior problems, spousal stress, and family food choices in children with and without autism spectrum disorder.

Author information

1
Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 465 Medford Street, Suite 500, Charlestown, MA, 02129, USA. carol.curtin@umassmed.edu.
2
United States Department of Agriculture, Food & Nutrition Service, Western Regional Office, 90 Seventh Street Suite 10-100, San Francisco, CA, 94103, USA. kristie.hubbard@fns.usda.gov.
3
Division of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, 336 Cunz Hall, 1841 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA. anderson.1767@osu.edu.
4
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA, 01655, USA. eric.mick@umassmed.edu.
5
Department of Public Health & Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA, 02111, USA. aviva.must@tufts.edu.
6
Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 465 Medford Street, Suite 500, Charlestown, MA, 02129, USA. linda.bandini@umassmed.edu.

Abstract

Mealtime behavior problems and family stress occur frequently among families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, it is unknown whether food selectivity is an associated factor. The associations of high food selectivity with mealtime behavior problems, spousal stress, and influence on family members were assessed among 53 children with ASD and 58 typically developing (TD) children ages 3-11 years. Compared to TD children, children with ASD were more likely to have high food selectivity, and their parents reported more mealtime behavior problems, higher spousal stress, and influence on what other family members ate. High food selectivity was associated with mealtime behavior problems in both groups. Interventions to reduce food selectivity may lead to decreases in mealtime behavior problems.

KEYWORDS:

Autism spectrum disorder; Food selectivity; Mealtime behaviors

PMID:
26070276
PMCID:
PMC4573255
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-015-2490-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center