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PLoS One. 2014 Jun 30;9(6):e101050. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0101050. eCollection 2014.

Correlation between exposure to magnetic fields and embryonic development in the first trimester.

Author information

1
Clinical and Translational Research Center, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, PR China.
2
Department of Reproductive Epidemiology and Social Science, National Population and Family Planning Key Laboratory of Contraceptive Drugs and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, Shanghai, PR China.
3
Department of Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, PR China.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Maternal and Child Hospital of Xuhui District, Shanghai, PR China.
5
Division of Research, Kaiser Foundation Research Institute, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California, United States of America.
6
Children's Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, PR China.
7
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Fifth People's Hospital of Shanghai, School of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

Erratum in

  • PLoS One. 2014;9(10):e111008.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the correlation between maternal magnetic field (MF) exposure in daily life and embryonic development.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study was conducted among 149 pregnant women who were seeking induced abortion of unwanted pregnancies. Participating women were asked to wear an EMDEX Lite magnetic field meter for a 24-h period to obtain MF exposure level within 4 weeks following the abortion. Embryonic bud and sac lengths were measured through B-mode ultrasound before the surgical abortion. Embryo sections were prepared and examined for histological changes, and the apoptosis status of the deciduas was examined using the TUNEL apoptosis assay.

RESULTS:

Embryonic bud length was inversely associated with maternal daily MF exposure level; the association was statistically significant at the time-weighted-average and 75th percentile of MF exposure levels, with coefficients of -3.09 (P = 0.0479) and -3.07 (P = 0.0228), respectively. Logistic regression for examining the risk of higher MF exposure indicated that women with her 75th percentile of daily MF measurements ≥0.82 mG had a 3.95-fold risk of having a fetus with a shorter embryonic bud length than those whose daily MF exposure were <0.82 mG. MF exposure was associated with a higher degree of apoptosis, but the association was not statistically significant. We failed to find a statistical correlation between MF exposure and embryonic sac length and histological changes in the first trimester.

CONCLUSION:

Prenatal MF exposure may have an adverse effect on embryonic development.

PMID:
24977708
PMCID:
PMC4076237
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0101050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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