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J Crit Care. 2018 Jun;45:149-155. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2018.02.006. Epub 2018 Feb 16.

Prediction of parental posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depression after a child's critical hospitalization.

Author information

1
European University of Madrid, School of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Psychology, Spain. Electronic address: rocio.rodriguez.rey@gmail.com.
2
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, School of Psychology, Department of Biological and Health Psychology, Spain. Electronic address: jesus.alonso@uam.es.
3
St George's University Hospital NHS Trust, UK. Electronic address: gcolvill@sgul.ac.uk.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the role of parental resilience, emotions accessed during admission and perceived stress in predicting the degree of parental posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression symptoms after a child's treatment in intensive care.

METHODS:

This was prospective longitudinal cohort study. A total of 196 parents of pediatric intensive care survivors completed questionnaires assessing resilience, perceived stress, emotions experienced during admission, 48h post-discharge (T0). Sociodemographic and medical data were also collected. Main outcomes were anxiety, depression and PTSD, three (T1) and six (T2) months later.

RESULTS:

At T2, 23% of parents reported clinically significant levels of symptoms of PTSD, 21% reported moderate-severe anxiety, and 9% reported moderate-severe depression. These rates were not statistically different to rates at T1. Path analyses indicated that 47% of the variance in psychopathology symptoms at T2 could be predicted from the variables assessed at T0. Resilience was a strong negative predictor of psychopathology symptoms, but this effect was mostly indirect, mediated by the stress that parents perceive during their child's critical hospitalization.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mobilizing coping in order to maintain resilience and to decrease their perceived stress levels could improve parents' mental health outcomes following their child's intensive care treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Depression; Longitudinal; Parents; Pediatric intensive care; Posttraumatic stress

PMID:
29477091
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrc.2018.02.006

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