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Carbohydr Polym. 2012 Sep 1;90(1):134-9. doi: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2012.05.005. Epub 2012 May 8.

Characterization of fungal sulfated polysaccharides and their synergistic anticancer effects with doxorubicin.

Author information

1
National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, 155-1 Li-Nung St., Sec. 2, Shipai, Peitou, Taipei 112, Taiwan; Institute of Biophotonics, National Yang-Ming University, 155-1 Li-Nung St., Sec. 2, Shipai, Peitou, Taipei 112, Taiwan.
2
National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, 155-1 Li-Nung St., Sec. 2, Shipai, Peitou, Taipei 112, Taiwan.

Abstract

Sulfated polysaccharides (SPSs) from two edible fungal species, including two strains of Antrodia cinnamomea and Poria cocos, were isolated. Fucose, glucosamine, galactose, glucose, and mannose were the major sugars in the SPSs, and these SPSs had a high sulfate content. The area percentage of low-molecular-weight SPSs (1-100 kDa) covered almost half of the SPS mixture of the A. cinnamomea strains. In contrast, high-molecular-weight SPSs (>1000 kDa) of P. cocos covered a large proportion of the area at 30.06%. SPSs from A. cinnamomea B86 showed stronger inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) tube formation in an in vitro assay of angiogenesis, than did A. cinnamomea 35396 or P. cocos. The degree of sulfation paralleled their antiangiogenic activity. When tumor cells were concurrently exposed to doxorubicin (DOX) and fungal SPSs, SPSs synergistically increased the cytotoxicity of DOX to different degree up to 50-fold. Fungal SPSs may offer new applications for combinational-therapy drugs.

PMID:
24751021
DOI:
10.1016/j.carbpol.2012.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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