Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Dermatol Sci. 2014 Jun;74(3):193-203. doi: 10.1016/j.jdermsci.2014.02.001. Epub 2014 Feb 16.

Influence of sensory neuropeptides on human cutaneous wound healing process.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neurosciences of Brest (EA4685), University of Western Brittany, Brest, France.
2
Laboratory of Neurosciences of Brest (EA4685), University of Western Brittany, Brest, France; Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Brest, Brest, France. Electronic address: laurent.misery@chu-brest.fr.
3
Laboratory of Neurosciences of Brest (EA4685), University of Western Brittany, Brest, France; Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Brest, Brest, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Close interactions exist between primary sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and skin cells. The PNS may be implicated in the modulation of different skin functions as wound healing.

OBJECTIVE:

Study the influence of sensory neurons in human cutaneous wound healing.

METHODS:

We incubated injured human skin explants either with rat primary sensory neurons from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or different neuropeptides (vasoactive intestinal peptide or VIP, calcitonin gene-related peptide or CGRP, substance P or SP) at various concentrations. Then we evaluated their effects on the proliferative and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling phases, dermal fibroblasts adhesion and differentiation into myofibroblasts.

RESULTS:

Thus, DRG and all studied neuromediators increased fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation and act on the expression ratio between collagen type I and type III in favor of collagen I, particularly between the 3rd and 7th day of culture. Furthermore, the enzymatic activities of matrix metalloprotesases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were increased in the first days of wound healing process. Finally, the adhesion of human dermal fibroblasts and their differentiation into myofibroblasts were promoted after incubation with neuromediators. Interestingly, the most potent concentrations for each tested molecules, were the lowest concentrations, corresponding to physiological concentrations.

CONCLUSION:

Sensory neurons and their derived-neuropeptides are able to promote skin wound healing.

KEYWORDS:

Cutaneous wound healing; Neuropeptides; Sensory neurons

PMID:
24630238
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdermsci.2014.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center