Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

Neuroimage. 2019 Jan 3;188:733-742. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.01.002. [Epub ahead of print]

Awake and behaving mouse fMRI during Go/No-Go task.

Author information

1
Institute of Neuroscience, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Sciences and Intelligence Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China; State Key Laboratory of Neuroscience, Key Laboratory of Primate Neurobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China; School of Future Technology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
2
Institute of Neuroscience, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Sciences and Intelligence Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.
3
School of Biomedical Engineering, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Image Processing, Key Laboratory of Mental Health of the Ministry of Education, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.
4
Institute of Neuroscience, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Sciences and Intelligence Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China; State Key Laboratory of Neuroscience, Key Laboratory of Primate Neurobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.
5
Institute of Neuroscience, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Sciences and Intelligence Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China; State Key Laboratory of Neuroscience, Key Laboratory of Primate Neurobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: tonylicy@ion.ac.cn.
6
Institute of Neuroscience, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Sciences and Intelligence Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: zliang@ion.ac.cn.

Abstract

Functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) has been widely used to examine the functional neural networks in both the evoked and resting states. However, most fMRI studies in rodents are performed under anesthesia, which greatly limits the scope of their application, and behavioral relevance. Efforts have been made to image rodents in the awake condition, either in the resting state or in response to sensory or optogenetic stimulation. However, fMRI in awake behaving rodents has not yet been achieved. In the current study, a novel fMRI paradigm for awake and behaving mice was developed, allowing functional imaging of the mouse brain in an olfaction-based go/no-go task. High resolution functional imaging with limited motion and image distortion were achieved at 9.4T with a cryogenic coil in awake and behaving mice. Distributed whole-brain spatiotemporal patterns were revealed, with drastically different activity profiles for go versus no-go trials. Therefore, we have demonstrated the feasibility of functional imaging of an olfactory behavior in awake mice. This fMRI paradigm in awake behaving mice could lead to novel insights into neural mechanisms underlying behaviors at a whole-brain level.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center