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J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2016 Jan;39(1):42-53. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2015.12.004. Epub 2016 Feb 1.

Attenuation Effect of Spinal Manipulation on Neuropathic and Postoperative Pain Through Activating Endogenous Anti-Inflammatory Cytokine Interleukin 10 in Rat Spinal Cord.

Author information

1
Professor, Parker University, Parker Research Institute, Dallas, TX. Electronic address: song@parker.edu.
2
Research Scientist, Parker University, Parker Research Institute, Dallas, TX.
3
(Volunteer) Research Assistant, Parker University, Parker Research Institute, Dallas, TX.
4
Professor, Parker University, Parker Research Institute, Dallas, TX.
5
Research Consultant, Parker University, Parker Research Institute, Dallas, TX.
6
Associate Professor, Parker University, Parker Research Institute, Dallas, TX.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to investigate roles of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 10 and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in spinal manipulation-induced analgesic effects of neuropathic and postoperative pain.

METHODS:

Neuropathic and postoperative pain were mimicked by chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) (CCD) and decompression (de-CCD) in adult, male, Sprague-Dawley rats. Behavioral pain after CCD and de-CCD was determined by the increased thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity of the affected hindpaw. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiological recordings, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to examine the neural inflammation, neural excitability, and expression of c-Fos and PKC as well as levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-10 in blood plasma, DRG, or the spinal cord. We used the activator adjusting instrument, a chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy tool, to deliver force to the spinous processes of L5 and L6.

RESULTS:

After CCD and de-CCD treatments, the animals exhibited behavioral and neurochemical signs of neuropathic pain manifested as mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, DRG inflammation, DRG neuron hyperexcitability, induction of c-Fos, and the increased expression of PKCγ in the spinal cord as well as increased level of IL-1β and TNF-α in DRG and the spinal cord. Repetitive Activator-assisted spinal manipulative therapy significantly reduced simulated neuropathic and postoperative pain, inhibited or reversed the neurochemical alterations, and increased the anti-inflammatory IL-10 in the spinal cord.

CONCLUSION:

These findings show that spinal manipulation may activate the endogenous anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the spinal cord and thus has the potential to alleviate neuropathic and postoperative pain.

KEYWORDS:

Ganglia; Interleukin-10; Interleukin-1beta; Nervous System; Pain; Spinal; Spinal manipulation; Trauma

PMID:
26837229
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmpt.2015.12.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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