Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

J Epidemiol Community Health. 2019 Jul;73(7):652-659. doi: 10.1136/jech-2018-211594. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

Association of binge drinking in adolescence and early adulthood with high blood pressure: findings from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (1994-2008).

Author information

1
Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States.
2
Division of General Medical Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States.
3
Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States jianrong.zhang@wustl.edu.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

An investigation of the risk of high blood pressure (HBP) associated with heavy alcohol consumption in adolescence and early adulthood is lacking. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association between binge drinking from adolescence to early adulthood and the risk of HBP in early adulthood.

METHODS:

We applied logistic regression to publicly available, population-representative data from waves I (1994-1995; ages 12-18) and IV (2007-2008; ages 24-32) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (n=5114) to determine whether past 12-month binge drinking in adolescence (wave I) and early adulthood (wave IV) was associated with HBP in early adulthood after adjusting for covariates, including smoking and body mass index. HBP was defined according to both the former and new classifications.

RESULTS:

HBP was significantly, positively associated with infrequent binge drinking (less than once a week) in adolescence based on the new classification (overall: OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.49; male: OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.81) and frequent binge drinking (heavy consumption) in adolescence based on the former classification (overall: OR= 1.64, 95% CI 1.22 to 2.22; male: OR= 1.79, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.60). The risk of HBP was high when participants engaged in frequent binge drinking in both adolescence and early adulthood, especially based on the former classification (overall: OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.13 to 5.20; female: OR 5.81, 95% CI 2.26 to 14.93).

CONCLUSION:

Binge drinking in adolescence may increase risk of HBP in early adulthood. This association is independent of other important risk factors for HPB, such as smoking and obesity.

KEYWORDS:

adolescence; alcohol consumption; binge drinking; early adulthood; high blood pressure

PMID:
30971421
DOI:
10.1136/jech-2018-211594

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center