Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

Behav Brain Res. 2015 Nov 1;294:102-10. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2015.07.053. Epub 2015 Aug 5.

Assessing cognitive function following medial prefrontal stroke in the rat.

Author information

1
Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
2
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Donnelly Centre, 160 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E1, Canada.
3
Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Medical Science Building, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada; Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Donnelly Centre, 160 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E1, Canada; Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Donnelly Centre, 160 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E1, Canada.
4
Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address: dcorbett@uottawa.ca.

Abstract

Cognitive impairments are prevalent following clinical stroke; however, preclinical research has focused almost exclusively on motor deficits. In order to conduct systematic evaluations into the nature of post-stroke cognitive dysfunction and recovery, it is crucial to develop focal stroke models that predominantly affect cognition while leaving motor function intact. Herein, we evaluated a range of cognitive functions 1-4 months following focal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) stroke using a battery of tests. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent focal ischemia induced in the mPFC using bilateral intracerebral injections of endothelin-1, or sham surgery. Cognitive function was assessed using an open field, several object recognition tests, attentional set-shifting, light-dark box, spontaneous alternation, Barnes maze, and win-shift/win-stay tests. Prefrontal cortex damage resulted in significant changes in object recognition function, behavioural flexibility, and anxiety-like behaviour, while spontaneous alternation and locomotor function remained intact. These deficits are similar to the cognitive deficits following stroke in humans. Our results suggest that this model may be useful for identifying and developing potential therapies for improving post-stroke cognitive dysfunction.

KEYWORDS:

Animal models; Cognition; Executive function; Medial prefrontal cortex; Rat; Stroke

PMID:
26254877
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbr.2015.07.053
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center