Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

Food Chem. 2014;152:133-9. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.11.002. Epub 2013 Nov 12.

Amygdalin content of seeds, kernels and food products commercially-available in the UK.

Author information

1
School of Food Science & Nutrition, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom; Department of Food Science & Engineering, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, PMB 4000, Ogbomoso, Nigeria.
2
School of Food Science & Nutrition, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom.
3
School of Food Science & Nutrition, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom. Electronic address: M.Morgan@leeds.ac.uk.

Abstract

Cyanogenic glycosides are a large group of secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, including many plants that are commonly consumed by humans. The diverse chemical nature of cyanogenic glycosides means that extraction and analysis of individual compounds can be difficult. In addition, degradation can be rapid under appropriate conditions. Amygdalin is one of the cyanogenic glycosides found, for example, in apples, apricots and almonds. We have developed and applied a high performance liquid chromatographic procedure for amygdalin quantification to investigate extraction efficiency and to determine levels in a range of commercially-available foods for the first time. Our results show that seed from Rosaceae species contained relatively high amounts (range 0.1-17.5 mg g(-1)) of amygdalin compared to seed from non-Rosaceae species (range 0.01-0.2 mg g(-1)). The amygdalin content of processed food products was very low.

KEYWORDS:

Amygdalin; Cyanide toxicity; Cyanogenic glycosides; Cyanogenic plants

PMID:
24444917
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.11.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for White Rose Research Online
Loading ...
Support Center