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Int Orthop. 2016 Jan;40(1):197-203. doi: 10.1007/s00264-015-2824-5. Epub 2015 Jul 9.

Alternatives to autograft evaluated in a rabbit segmental bone defect.

Author information

1
Extremity Trauma and Regenerative Medicine, United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3698 Chambers Pass BLDG 3611, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, TX, 78234, USA.
2
Arteriocyte Medical Systems, Hopkinton, MA, USA.
3
Extremity Trauma and Regenerative Medicine, United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3698 Chambers Pass BLDG 3611, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, TX, 78234, USA. chrisrathbone29@gmail.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was designed to identify strategies for treating bone defects that can be completed on the day of surgery.

METHODS:

Forty New Zealand white rabbits with unilateral rabbit radius segmental defects (15 mm) were treated with commercially available scaffolds containing either demineralised bone matrix (DBM) or a collagen/beta-tricalcium phosphate composite (Col:β-TCP); each scaffold was combined with either bone marrow aspirate (BMA) or concentrated BMA (cBMA). Bone regeneration was assessed through radiographic and histological analyses.

RESULTS:

The concentration of nucleated cells, colony-forming unit-fibroblasts and platelets were increased and haematocrit concentration decreased in cBMA as compared to BMA (p < 0.05). Radiographic analyses of bone formation and defect bridging demonstrated significantly greater bone regeneration in the defects treated with DBM grafts as compared to Col:β-TCP grafts. The healing of bones treated with Col:β-TCP was improved when augmented with cBMA.

CONCLUSIONS:

Scaffolds containing either DBM or Col:β-TCP with BMA or cBMA are effective same-day strategies available to clinicians for the treatment of bone defects; the latter scaffold may be more effective if combined with cBMA.

KEYWORDS:

Bone marrow aspirate; Demineralised bone matrix; Rabbit; Segmental defect; Tricalcium phosphate

PMID:
26156711
DOI:
10.1007/s00264-015-2824-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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