Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

J Adolesc Health. 2015 Jun;56(6):639-45. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.02.010.

Alcohol use at the cusp of adolescence: a prospective national birth cohort study of prevalence and risk factors.

Author information

1
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania; Centre for Longitudinal Studies, Department of Quantitative Social Science, UCL Institute of Education, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: jmaggs@psu.edu.
2
Department of Sociology and Criminology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania.
3
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
4
Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York.
5
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To estimate the prevalence of alcohol use at the age of 10-11 years and document variation by early sociodemographic and concurrent alcohol-specific risk factors.

METHODS:

The Millennium Cohort Study is a prospective, nationally representative study of live births in the United Kingdom across 12 months. A random sample of electoral wards was stratified to adequately represent U.K. countries, economically deprived areas, and areas with high concentrations of Asian and Black British families. A total of 12,305 child-mother pairs provided self-report data at 9 months (mother's marital status, age, education, occupational level; child gender, ethnicity, country) and age 10-11 years (adolescent alcohol use and attitudes).

RESULTS:

After adjusting for attrition and sampling design, 13.4% of 10- to 11-year-olds had had an alcoholic drink (more than few sips), 1.2% had felt drunk, and .6% had five or more drinks at a time. Odds of ever drinking were higher among boys (1.47, 95% confidence interval, 1.29-1.68) and lower among early adolescents who were Asian British (vs. white; .09, .05-.17) or Black British (.42, .29-.62). Beyond sociodemographic differences, more positive attitudes about alcohol were associated with greater odds of drinking (1.70, 1.51-1.91), feeling drunk (2.96, 2.07-4.24), and having five or more drinks (4.20, 2.66-6.61).

CONCLUSIONS:

Alcohol use in the last year of primary school was identified but not common. Its use varied by sociodemographic groups; early adolescents with more positive alcohol attitudes had especially high risks of early alcohol initiation. Results support calls for increased surveillance and screening for very early drinking.

KEYWORDS:

Age of onset; Alcohol; Alcohol expectancies; Binge drinking; Drunkenness; Early adolescent; Millennium cohort study; Prevalence

PMID:
26003579
PMCID:
PMC4442274
DOI:
10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.02.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center