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See 1 citation in Acta Diabetol 2015:

Acta Diabetol. 2015 Jun;52(3):557-71. doi: 10.1007/s00592-014-0688-6. Epub 2014 Dec 21.

Trends over 8 years in quality of diabetes care: results of the AMD Annals continuous quality improvement initiative.

Author information

1
AMD - Associazione Medici Diabetologi, Rome, Italy, mrossi@negrisud.it.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Quality of care monitoring is a key strategy for health policy. In Italy, the AMD Annals continuous monitoring and quality improvement initiative has been in place since 2006. Results after 8 years are now available.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Quality of diabetes care indicators during the years 2004-2011 were extracted from electronic medical records of 300 diabetes clinics. From 200,000 to 500,000 patients with type 2 diabetes were analyzed per year. Six process indicators, eight intermediate outcome indicators, seven indicators of treatment intensity/appropriateness, and a quality of care summary score (Q score) were evaluated. Previous studies documented that the risk of developing a new cardiovascular event was 80 % higher in patients with a Q score <15 and 20 % higher in those with a score between 15 and 25, as compared to those with a score >25.

RESULTS:

The proportion of patients with HbA1c ≤7 %, LDL cholesterol <100 mg/dl, and blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg increased by 4.8, 21.9, and 10.0 %, respectively. Process and treatment intensity/appropriateness indicators consistently improved. The proportion of patients with a Q score <15 decreased from 13.5 to 6.5 %, while those with a Q score >25 increased from 22.9 to 38.5 %.

CONCLUSIONS:

AMD Annals document the progress in quality of diabetes care. Longitudinal improvements in Q score can translate into less cardiovascular events, with evident clinical and economic implications. AMD Annals represent a physician-led effort not requiring allocation of extra-economic resources, which is easy to implement and deeply rooted in routine clinical practice. They are a potential case model for other healthcare systems.

PMID:
25528003
DOI:
10.1007/s00592-014-0688-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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