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Z Gerontol Geriatr. 2017 Jan;50(1):52-58. doi: 10.1007/s00391-016-1031-3. Epub 2016 Mar 4.

[Acceptance of dementia diagnostics by getriatric hospital patients : Comparison of various investigation methods with emphasis on FDG-PET imaging].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Forschungsgruppe Geriatrie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Reinickendorfer Str. 61, 13347, Berlin, Deutschland. melanie.estrella@charite.de.
2
Evangelisches Geriatriezentrum Berlin, Berlin, Deutschland.
3
Forschungsgruppe Geriatrie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Reinickendorfer Str. 61, 13347, Berlin, Deutschland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The number of people with dementia is continuously rising, in hospitals as well. For the diagnostics novel methods are available but the attitude of the patients to these methods is yet unknown.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to evaluatethe opinion of geriatric hospital patients with suspected dementia on the various possible methods of diagnosing dementia, especially fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Additionally, it was assessed if there are differences in toleration between imaging of the brain and conventional diagnostics by neuropsychological testing and if information on the diagnostic methods and the patient's physical or cognitive status influence their opinion.

METHOD:

Within the framework of the iDSS001 clinical trial 90 geriatric hospital patients with suspected dementia were interviewed with respect to examinations performed for diagnosing dementia, e.g. anamnesis including physical and neurological examinations, neuropsychological testing, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET imaging.

RESULTS:

Imaging of the brain was tolerated less than anamnesis including physical and neurological examinations, neuropsychological testing and cerebrospinal fluid analysis and patients also felt they were less informed about these procedures. The generally well-accepted FDG-PET imaging procedure was received slightly better than MRI. Cognitively impaired and less depressed patients were less willing to allow repeat MRI examinations.

CONCLUSION:

The results suggest that imaging of the brain is perceived by cognitively impaired hospital patients as being more burdensome than conventional diagnostics, such as neuropsychological testing. Improved care during the investigations as well as physical and organizational adjustments could increase the acceptance.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive impairment; Dementia diagnosis; Diagnostic imaging; Patient information; Patient satisfaction

PMID:
26942458
DOI:
10.1007/s00391-016-1031-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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