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Ann Fam Med. 2014 Jul;12(4):310-6. doi: 10.1370/afm.1663.

A school-based study of adolescent all-terrain vehicle exposure, safety behaviors, and crash experience.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa University of Iowa Children's Hospital, Iowa City, Iowa charles-jennissen@uiowa.edu.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa University of Iowa Injury Prevention Research, Iowa City, Iowa.
3
University of Iowa Children's Hospital, Iowa City, Iowa Division of Pediatric Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinic, Iowa City, Iowa.
4
US Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, DC.
5
University of Iowa Children's Hospital, Iowa City, Iowa.
6
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa.

Erratum in

  • Ann Fam Med. 2014 Sep-Oct;12(5):401.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

More youth are killed every year in the United States in all-terrain vehicle (ATV) crashes than on bicycles, and since 2001, one-fifth of all ATV fatalities have involved victims aged 15 years or younger. Effectively preventing pediatric ATV-related deaths and injuries requires knowledge about youth riding practices. Our objective was to examine ATV use, crash prevalence, and riding behaviors among adolescent students in a rural state.

METHODS:

We administered a cross-sectional survey to 4,684 youths aged 11 to 16 years at 30 schools across Iowa from November 2010 to April 2013. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed.

RESULTS:

Regardless of rurality, at least 75% of students reported having been on an ATV, with 38% of those riding daily or weekly. Among ATV riders, 57% had been in a crash. Most riders engaged in risky behaviors, including riding with passengers (92%), on public roads (81%), or without a helmet (64%). Almost 60% reported engaging in all 3 behaviors; only 2% engaged in none. Multivariable modeling revealed male youth, students riding daily/weekly, and those reporting both riding on public roads and with passengers were 1.61 (95% CI, 1.36-1.91), 3.73 (95% CI, 3.10-4.50), and 3.24 (95% CI, 2.09-5.04) times more likely to report a crash, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Three-fourths of youths surveyed were exposed to ATVs. The majority of riders had engaged in unsafe behaviors and experienced a crash. Given this widespread use and the potentially considerable morbidity of pediatric ATV crashes, prevention efforts, including anticipatory guidance by primary care clinicians serving families at risk, should be a higher priority.

KEYWORDS:

accidents; adolescent behavior; all-terrain vehicle; helmet; injury prevention; prevention & control; rural; safety

PMID:
25024238
PMCID:
PMC4096467
DOI:
10.1370/afm.1663
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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