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Jpn J Clin Oncol. 2014 Aug;44(8):718-28. doi: 10.1093/jjco/hyu075. Epub 2014 Jun 19.

A Japanese region-wide survey of the knowledge, difficulties and self-reported palliative care practices among nurses.

Author information

1
Department of Palliative Nursing, Health Sciences, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi kazukisato@med.tohoku.ac.jp.
2
Department of Palliative Nursing, Health Sciences, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi.
3
Palliative Care Partners, Tokyo.
4
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Teikyo University of Science, Tokyo.
5
Department of Adult Health Nursing/Palliative Care Nursing, School of Health Sciences and Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo.
6
Department of Discharge Planning and Community Coordination, Tsuruoka Municipal Shonai Hospital, Tsuruoka, Yamagata.
7
Department of Psycho-Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, East Kashiwa, Chiba.
8
Palliative Care Team, Division of Nursing, Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka.
9
Consortium for Home Health Care in Nagasaki, University of Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan.
10
Division of Medical Oncology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated palliative care knowledge, difficulty and self-reported practice among a region-wide sample of nurses who cared for cancer patients in Japan.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was distributed to 9 designated cancer centers, 17 community hospitals and 73 district nurse services across 4 regions in 2008. We used the Palliative Care Knowledge Test, the Palliative Care Difficulty Scale (five-point Likert scale) and the Palliative Care Self-Reported Practices Scale (five-point Likert scale).

RESULTS:

In total, 2378 out of 3008 nurses (79%) responded. The knowledge, difficulty and self-reported practice scores were 51 ± 20%, 3.2 ± 0.7 and 3.7 ± 0.6, respectively. In the knowledge test, philosophy scored highest (88 ± 26%) and psychiatric problems scored lowest (37 ± 29%). In the difficulty test, alleviating symptoms scored most difficult (3.5 ± 0.8) and providing expert support scored least difficult (2.9 ± 1.3). In the self-reported practice questionnaire, pain and delirium relief were most frequently (4.0 ± 0.8) and least frequently (3.1 ± 0.9) provided, respectively. Knowledge was significantly poorer in community hospitals (P = 0.035); difficulty scores were significantly higher in community hospitals (P < 0.001) and district nurse services (P = 0.013); and self-reported practice scores were significantly poorer in community hospitals (P < 0.001) but superior in district nurse services (P < 0.001) than in designated cancer centers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Knowledge, difficulty and self-reported practice for symptom management, particularly psychological symptoms, were insufficient, particularly in community hospitals. Education, expert support and adequate clinical experiences would help provide quality palliative care.

KEYWORDS:

attitude; health knowledge; neoplasm; nurse; palliative care; practice; terminal care

PMID:
24948699
DOI:
10.1093/jjco/hyu075
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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