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J Trace Elem Med Biol. 1996 Jun;10(2):61-7.

Concentrations of mercury, cadmium and lead in brain and kidney of second trimester fetuses and infants.

Author information

1
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

The concentrations of mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in brain (cerebrum) and kidney during fetal (second trimester terminations or abortions, n = 20) and postnatal (infants deceased before three months of age, n = 15) development have been studied. Information on possible sources of exposure was obtained from the mothers of the fetuses, but not from those of the infants. The median concentration of Hg in the brain was 4 micrograms/ kg wet weight in both fetuses and infants (total range < or = 2-23 micrograms/kg). The concentrations of Hg in the kidneys were significantly higher than in brain, median of Hg 6 micrograms/kg (range < or = 5-34 micrograms/kg) in fetuses and 10 micrograms/kg (< or = 7-37) in infants. There was a tendency of increasing concentration of Hg in the fetal kidney, but not in the brain, with increasing number of amalgam fillings in the mothers. The concentration of Cd in the brain was less than 1 microgram/kg in most cases, both in fetuses and infants. The concentration of Cd in the kidneys was significantly higher, with a median of about 2 micrograms/kg (1-8 micrograms/kg) in both groups. There was no detectable association between tissue Cd concentrations and the smoking habits of the mothers. The concentration of Pb in brain was below 10 micrograms/kg in most cases. In the kidneys, the concentrations of Pb were significantly higher, with a median of 12 micrograms/kg in the fetuses (range < or = 6-20 micrograms/kg) and 15 micrograms/kg (< or = 9-36 micrograms/kg) in the infants. In general, the concentrations of Cd and Pb were lower than in previously reported studies.

PMID:
8829128
DOI:
10.1016/S0946-672X(96)80013-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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