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J Immunol. 1985 Apr;134(4):2610-6.

Tissue-specific pretranslational regulation of complement production in human mononuclear phagocytes.

Abstract

The net production of the complement protein C2, C4, and factor B differ among mononuclear phagocytes from peripheral blood and different tissues in experimental animals and in humans. To examine the mechanisms that regulate these differences in humans, the proportions of C2-producing cells, the average single-cell production rate of C2, the posttranslational glycosylation and kinetics of secretion of C2 and factor B, and the amounts of C2 and factor B mRNA were examined in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytes, monocytes maintained up to 2 wk in culture, and freshly isolated tissue macrophages from breast milk and bronchoalveolar lavage. In addition, the biosynthesis of two other proteins synthesized and secreted by mononuclear phagocytes, C3 and lysozyme, were examined. We report that despite comparable rates of C3 and lysozyme synthesis and similar processing and kinetics of secretion of C2 and factor B, the freshly isolated tissue macrophage differs from the monocyte-derived macrophage in the proportion of C2-producing cells, in the average single-cell production rate of complement, and in the amounts of specific C2 and factor B mRNA. These differences are tissue specific, because C2-specific mRNA content in bronchoalveolar macrophages is considerably greater than in breast milk macrophages, although the amounts of factor B mRNA are comparable. These data suggest that tissue-specific regulation of complement production in human mononuclear phagocytes occurs at a pretranslational level. These studies now provide a basis for investigation of the molecular effects of agents that modulate the biologic functions of monocytes and macrophages.

PMID:
3844437
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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