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Transplant Proc. 2020 Mar;52(2):462-464. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2019.12.019. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Attitude Toward Related Living Donation Among Patients on Waiting List for Liver Transplantation.

Author information

1
International Collaborative Donor Project ("Proyecto Colaborativo Internacional Donante"), Murcia, Spain; Department of Psychology, Catholic University of Murcia (UCAM), Murcia, Spain.
2
International Collaborative Donor Project ("Proyecto Colaborativo Internacional Donante"), Murcia, Spain; Department of Surgery, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain; Transplant Unit, Surgery Service, IMIB - Virgen de la Arrixaca University Clinical Hospital, Murcia, Spain. Electronic address: arzrios@um.es.
3
Department of Psychology, Catholic University of Murcia (UCAM), Murcia, Spain.
4
International Collaborative Donor Project ("Proyecto Colaborativo Internacional Donante"), Murcia, Spain; Department of Surgery, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain; Transplant Unit, Surgery Service, IMIB - Virgen de la Arrixaca University Clinical Hospital, Murcia, Spain.
5
Digestive Service, University Hospital Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia Health Service, Murcia, Spain.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

In liver transplantation, living donation shows better and better results. However, rates of living liver donation (LLD) are low.

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the attitude towards LLD among patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation.

METHOD:

Study population: Patients included in the waiting list for liver transplantation who are not in code 0 and do not present with encephalopathy above grade I.

PROTOCOL:

After being included in the waiting list, they are informed of the study and they are cited in the Psychology Consultation.

INSTRUMENTS:

attitude questionnaire towards LLD, carried out in the Psychological Care consultation.

RESULTS:

Of the 147 patients included in the waiting list, 112 fulfilled the inclusion criteria in the study. After being cited in the consultation, 100% of respondents are in favor of living liver donation. However, when considering the related LLD, 80% of the respondents indicated that they would not accept a living donation from a family member and therefore did not want to complete the questionnaire. Of the remaining 20% who completed the study, 11% would accept it from any family member, 8% only from some family members (mainly excluding children and grandchildren), and the remaining 1% would accept it but excluded all their family members.

CONCLUSION:

Currently, there is a disconnect between patients' intentions in favor of living liver donation and the real attitude when they are on the waiting list and related living donation is raised.

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