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Transplant Proc. 2020 Mar;52(2):559-561. doi: 10.1016/j.transproceed.2019.11.037. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Impact of Hepatic Artery Thrombosis on the Success of a Liver Transplant Because of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Murcia, Spain; Instituto Murciano de Investigación Biosanitaria (IMIB-Arrixaca), Murcia, Spain. Electronic address: alconchelgago@gmail.com.
2
Department of Surgery, Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Murcia, Spain; Instituto Murciano de Investigación Biosanitaria (IMIB-Arrixaca), Murcia, Spain.
3
Instituto Murciano de Investigación Biosanitaria (IMIB-Arrixaca), Murcia, Spain.
4
Instituto Murciano de Investigación Biosanitaria (IMIB-Arrixaca), Murcia, Spain; Intensive Care Unit, Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Murcia, Spain.
5
Instituto Murciano de Investigación Biosanitaria (IMIB-Arrixaca), Murcia, Spain; Department of Hepatology, Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Murcia, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hepatic artery thrombosis is one of the most serious complications after liver transplant. Our objective is to evaluate the impact of arterial thrombosis on the postoperative evolution of a series of patients who received transplants because of hepatocellular carcinoma.

METHODS:

A retrospective study of 100 consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma liver transplants was performed from January 2011 to November 2017.

RESULTS:

Of the 100 transplant recipients, we have observed hepatic artery thrombosis in 4 of them, 3 premature and 1 delayed. All of them received retransplants after diagnosis by hepatic artery ultrasonography and arteriography. The descriptive analysis showed a significant relationship between the appearance of hepatic artery thrombosis with variables of postoperative severity, such as arrhythmias, atelectasis, pleural effusion, hemodialysis requirement, acute kidney failure, and respiratory failure. Although patients with hepatic artery thrombosis had a longer mean hospital stay, this was not statistically significant. There was decreased graft survival and overall survival of patients who experienced hepatic artery thrombosis.

CONCLUSION:

Although the incidence of hepatic artery thrombosis has been relatively low (4%), the early detection of risk factors, such as arterial anatomic anomalies that condition a complex anastomosis, should draw our attention, thus having at our disposal strict ultrasonography and arteriography surveillance protocols as well as prophylactic anticoagulation guidelines for receptors at risk.

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