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Neuroepidemiology. 2020 Feb 4:1-14. doi: 10.1159/000505626. [Epub ahead of print]

Dementia Research Fit for the Planet: Reflections on Population Studies of Dementia for Researchers and Policy Makers Alike.

Author information

1
Institute of Public Health, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, carol.brayne@medschl.cam.ac.uk.
2
Institute of Public Health, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
3
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.
4
Institute for Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology (IMBIE), Faculty of Medicine, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
5
INSERM, Bordeaux, France.
6
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
7
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm, Sweden.
8
Department of Epidemiology Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
9
Centre for Research in Ageing, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
10
University of Zaragoza, Spain and Instituo Investigacion Sanitaria Aragon, Zaragoza, Spain.
11
Institute of Biomedical Technologies, National Research Council (ITB-CNR), Segrate, Milan, Italy.
12
Department of Neurology, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
13
Department of Neurology Amsterdam University Medical Centres, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
14
Institute of Social Medicine, Occupational Health and Public Health, Medical Faculty, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
15
Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
16
Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
17
Institute of Mental Health, Nottingham University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
18
Department of Neuroscience, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.
19
Population Health Sciences Institute, Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom.

Abstract

In recent years, a rapidly increasing collection of investigative methods in addition to changes in diagnostic criteria for dementia have followed "high-tech" trends in medicine, with the aim to better define the dementia syndrome and its biological substrates, mainly in order to predict risk prior to clinical expression. These approaches are not without challenge. A set of guidelines have been developed by a group of European experts in population-based cohort research through a series of workshops, funded by the Joint Program for Neurodegenerative Disorders (JPND). The aims of the guidelines are to assist policy makers and researchers to understand (1) What population studies for ageing populations should encompass and (2) How to interpret the findings from population studies. Such studies are essential to provide evidence relevant to the understanding of healthy and frail brain ageing, including the dementia syndrome for contemporary and future societies by drawing on the past.

KEYWORDS:

Cohorts; Dementia; Guidelines; Population-based studies

PMID:
32018263
DOI:
10.1159/000505626
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