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Trends Cell Biol. 2019 Dec 10. pii: S0962-8924(19)30198-9. doi: 10.1016/j.tcb.2019.11.002. [Epub ahead of print]

Squeezing in a Meal: Myosin Functions in Phagocytosis.

Author information

1
Cell and Developmental Biology Department, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA.
2
IFOM, FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology, Milan, Italy.
3
Cell and Developmental Biology Department, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA. Electronic address: krendelm@upstate.edu.

Abstract

Phagocytosis is a receptor-mediated, actin-dependent process of internalization of large extracellular particles, such as pathogens or apoptotic cells. Engulfment of phagocytic targets requires the activity of myosins, actin-dependent molecular motors, which perform a variety of functions at distinct steps during phagocytosis. By applying force to actin filaments, the plasma membrane, and intracellular proteins and organelles, myosins can generate contractility, directly regulate actin assembly to ensure proper phagocytic internalization, and translocate phagosomes or other cargo to appropriate cellular locations. Recent studies using engineered microenvironments and phagocytic targets have demonstrated how altering the actomyosin cytoskeleton affects phagocytic behavior. Here, we discuss how studies using genetic and biochemical manipulation of myosins, force measurement techniques, and live-cell imaging have advanced our understanding of how specific myosins function at individual steps of phagocytosis.

KEYWORDS:

actin; macrophage; myosins; phagocytosis

PMID:
31836280
DOI:
10.1016/j.tcb.2019.11.002

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