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AIDS. 2019 Dec 5. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002460. [Epub ahead of print]

Monocytes from men living with HIV exhibit heightened atherogenic potential despite long term viral suppression with ART.

Author information

1
Healthy Ageing Program, Burnet Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia.
2
School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia.
3
Department of Infectious Diseases, The Alfred Hospital and Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia.
4
Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, 3001, Australia.
5
School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
6
These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

People living with HIV have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) despite effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). Monocytes play a key role in the early stages of atherosclerosis-driven CVD by forming lipid-laden foam cells within artery walls. HIV infection potentiates foam cell formation ex vivo, but the mechanisms contributing to this are not known.

METHODS:

We investigated the atherosclerosis-promoting potential of monocytes from 39 virologically suppressed men living with HIV (MLHIV) on ART and no evidence of CVD, and 25 HIV-uninfected controls of comparable age, sex, smoking status and CVD risk.

RESULTS:

Despite absence of clinical atherosclerosis in both MLHIV and uninfected cohorts (evidenced by a carotid intima-media thickness of 0.6 mm for both groups; p = 0.254), monocytes from MLHIV showed increased potential to form atherosclerosis-promoting foam cells compared to controls in an ex vivo assay (36.6% vs 27.6% respectively, p = 0.003). Consistent with observations of persistent inflammation and immune/endothelial activation in ART-treated HIV infection, levels of soluble TNF receptor II, CXCL10 and soluble VCAM-1 were elevated in MLHIV (p≤0.005 for all), but were not significantly associated with foam cell formation. Foam cell formation was associated with an impaired ability of monocytes to undergo reverse transmigration, and a reduced ability to efflux cholesterol ex vivo (p < 0.05 for both). Importantly, foam cell formation declined significantly with duration of viral suppression (p = 0.004).

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings highlight the persistence of HIV-related changes to the atherogenic potential of monocytes despite long-term viral suppression, and provide insights into mechanisms potentially driving increased CVD in ART-treated HIV infection.

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