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Cell Metab. 2020 Jan 7;31(1):92-104.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2019.11.004. Epub 2019 Dec 5.

Ten-Hour Time-Restricted Eating Reduces Weight, Blood Pressure, and Atherogenic Lipids in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome.

Author information

1
University of California, San Diego, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, 9434 Medical Center Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
2
Salk Institute for Biological Sciences, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
3
Salk Institute for Biological Sciences, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: satchin@salk.edu.
4
University of California, San Diego, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Medicine, 9434 Medical Center Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: ptaub@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

In animal models, time-restricted feeding (TRF) can prevent and reverse aspects of metabolic diseases. Time-restricted eating (TRE) in human pilot studies reduces the risks of metabolic diseases in otherwise healthy individuals. However, patients with diagnosed metabolic syndrome often undergo pharmacotherapy, and it has never been tested whether TRE can act synergistically with pharmacotherapy in animal models or humans. In a single-arm, paired-sample trial, 19 participants with metabolic syndrome and a baseline mean daily eating window of ≥14 h, the majority of whom were on a statin and/or antihypertensive therapy, underwent 10 h of TRE (all dietary intake within a consistent self-selected 10 h window) for 12 weeks. We found this TRE intervention improves cardiometabolic health for patients with metabolic syndrome receiving standard medical care including high rates of statin and anti-hypertensive use. TRE is a potentially powerful lifestyle intervention that can be added to standard medical practice to treat metabolic syndrome. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

KEYWORDS:

TRE; TRF; circadian rhythm; dyslipidemia; hypertension; impaired glucose tolerance; metabolic syndrome; obesity; time-restricted eating

PMID:
31813824
PMCID:
PMC6953486
[Available on 2021-01-07]
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2019.11.004

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