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J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2019 Oct 31. pii: S2213-2198(19)30899-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jaip.2019.10.010. [Epub ahead of print]

Associations of Prenatal Dietary Inflammatory Potential with Childhood Respiratory Outcomes in Project Viva.

Author information

1
Division of Medical Nutrition Education, College of Allied Health Professions, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Neb. Electronic address: ckhanson@unmc.edu.
2
Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Mass.
3
South Carolina Statewide Cancer Prevention and Control Program and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.
4
South Carolina Statewide Cancer Prevention and Control Program and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Connecting Health Innovations LLC, Columbia, SC.
5
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
6
Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
7
Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass.
8
Division of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Inflammation during pregnancy may be a factor in the developmental programming of asthma and wheeze in childhood.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine associations of inflammatory potential of prenatal diet with respiratory outcomes in early childhood and midchildhood.

METHODS:

Among 1424 mother-child pairs in Project Viva, a prebirth cohort, we examined associations of Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®) (first trimester, second trimester, and average of first and second trimesters) scores in relation to ever asthma and wheezing in the past year (early childhood and midchildhood); current asthma and lung function (midchildhood), and wheeze trajectory during 1 to 9 years. We used multivariable linear and logistic regression modeling, adjusting for relevant confounders.

RESULTS:

In a fully adjusted analysis, a more proinflammatory diet was associated with an early versus never wheeze trajectory (first- and second-trimester average fourth vs first quartile: odds ratio, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.14-3.13). A more proinflammatory diet during pregnancy also was associated with lower forced expiratory flow (forced expiratory flow at 25%-75%) in midchildhood (first- and second-trimester average fourth vs first quartile: β, -132 mL; 95% CI, -249 to -14). Results were evident for first-, but not second-, trimester DII and wheeze trajectory and midchildhood forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75%. Other child respiratory outcomes, including ever asthma, were not related to any DII measure during pregnancy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Proinflammatory diet during pregnancy is associated with wheeze trajectory during early childhood and decrements in small airways caliber in midchildhood, but not other respiratory outcomes in the offspring.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; Childhood; Diet; Inflammation; Lung function; Pregnancy; Wheeze

PMID:
31678301
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaip.2019.10.010

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