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Magn Reson Med. 2019 Nov 1. doi: 10.1002/mrm.28060. [Epub ahead of print]

Analysis of retention of gadolinium by brain, bone, and blood following linear gadolinium-based contrast agent administration in rats with experimental sepsis.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.
2
Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.
3
Advanced Magnetic Resonance Center, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

It is important to identify populations that may be vulnerable to the brain deposition of gadolinium (Gd) from MRI contrast agents. At intervals from 24 hours to 6 weeks following injection of a linear Gd contrast agent, the brain, blood and bone content of Gd were compared between control rats and those with experimental endotoxin-induced sepsis that results in neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier disruption.

METHODS:

Male rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide. Control animals received no injection. Twenty-four hours later, 0.2 mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine was injected intravenously. Brain, blood, and bone Gd levels were measured at 24 hours, 1 week, 3 weeks, and 6 weeks by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy.

RESULTS:

Blood Gd decreased rapidly between 24 hours and 1 week, and thereafter was undetectable, with no significant difference between lipopolysaccharide and control rats. Brain levels of Gd were significantly higher (4.29-2.36-fold) and bone levels slightly higher (1.35-1.11-fold) in lipopolysaccharide than control rats at all time points with significant retention at 6 weeks.

CONCLUSION:

Experimental sepsis results in significantly higher deposition of Gd in the brain and bone in rats. While blood Gd clears rapidly, brain and bone retained substantial Gd even at 6 weeks following contrast injection.

KEYWORDS:

bone; brain; deposition; gadolinium; lipopolysaccharide; sepsis

PMID:
31677194
DOI:
10.1002/mrm.28060

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